List of the Best Books of Modernity

List of the Best Books of Modernity

List of the Best Books of Modernity
pictureIt is not Kafka and Orwell that are more suitable for modern Russia, we are still far from the most hellish totalitarian regimes. Best of all, the Russian atmosphere will be conveyed by a novel about the Haitian dictatorship through the eyes of an Englishman. So far, this book contains more Grozny, but with due imagination, you can also see Moscow. Hannah Arendt “The banality of evil. Eichmann in Jerusalem »The best and therefore textbook description of the motivations of people doing the most transcendent filth, without having anything to do with it. Once again I note that Putin’s Russia is not Hitler’s Germany at all, but Eichmann is probably sleeping anywhere in anyone, wherever he lives. Eduard Limonov “Other Russia” After 2014 reads like step-by-step instructions for arranging New Russia, it just happened, that Limonov was one of the few who came up with the future of Russia in those days when the future did not interest anyone, so it is logical that it was his dreams that materialized – no one else just had a dream. And in the narrative, this is just a very good book about the unchanging Soviet-post-Soviet reality, about people, about the family, about culture. Alexander Korzhakov “Boris Yeltsin from Dawn to Dusk” The best post-Soviet memoirs about power. Over twenty years, only names and bad habits have changed, but principles have not changed. Stanislav Belkovsky “Repentance” An exhaustive psychological portrait of Russian “system liberals”, the prototypes are obvious, but it is unlikely that Kudrin or Ulyukaev are arranged differently from those that Belkovsky wrote about. Maxim Sokolov “Poetic views of Russians on history” The book is rare, so you can get by with the old columns of Sokolov available on the Kommersant website, and then you must read his new columns on the Izvestia website – in fact, this is something else that an intellectual who once agreed to serve this power is turning into. Dmitry Bykov “Written off” Classic Bykov about the fears and hopes of the liberal intelligentsia of Putin’s time. Simon Kordonsky “Russia, Local Federation” A punk sociologist who is loyal to the regime explains the logic of our crypto-feudalism, it’s literally not necessary to perceive, but at least very interesting. Alexander Solzhenitsyn “Russia in a collapse” Continuation of the brochure “How can we arrange Russia”, a very honest description of how everything really settled down . Now it’s interesting to read from the point of view that the nineties didn’t actually end (the book was published in 1998), and the book also has the expression “divided people”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *